Introduction

This document contains supplemental information for Automated Uptime™ Layer for Linux-based ftServer Systems, Release 9.0.9.0. It was published May 2017.

For general release information, see the Release Notes: Automated Uptime Layer for Linux-based ftServer Systems (R005L) or the complete set of documentation for Automated Uptime Layer for Linux-Based ftServer Systems, Release 9.0.7.0.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Release Information

The Red Hat Enterprise Linux™, Release 6.9 is now supported for use with the Stratus Automated Uptime Layer for Linux-based ftServer Systems, Release 9.0.9.0 CD, which contains the Automated Uptime Layer software distribution.

MINIMUM KERNEL: 2.6.32-696.el6

ftServer System Information

The ftServer systems running with this release must use firmware revisions for CPU BIOS and Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) which meet or exceed the following requirements:

MINIMUM BIOS: 6.3.58

MINUMUM BMC FW: 3.25

Operating System Installation and Custom Kickstart Files

Caution: If you use a custom kickstart file, do not allow the cloud-init package to install. The effect of installing the cloud-init package may not be reversible.

In general, you use the Automated Uptime Layer kickstart files to install the Linux operating system and Automated Uptime Layer. If you cannot use an Automated Uptime Layer kickstart file and you use a custom kickstart file, do not allow the cloud-init package to install. The effect of installing the cloud-init package may not be reversible. The Stratus kickstart file explicitly removes this package from the installation.

If the cloud-init package is installed, it configures the server as a cloud system. It creates a cloud login to be used as the default login. Moreover, it radically changes network settings to something useful for a cloud system. In a typical Stratus environment, this change causes the system to be unbootable.

Noting the preceding information, see the information about using a customized kickstart file in Stratus Automated Uptime Layer for Linux-based ftServer Systems: Installation and Configuration (R013L).

Configuring Email Notification with the System Health Checker

Automated Uptime Layer for Linux-based ftServer Systems includes a System Health Checker (shc) script that runs periodically to check the health of the ftServer system. You can configure the shc script to notify a system administrator automatically in the event of a problem.

For example, if either CPU-I/O enclosure is found to be not safe-to-pull (not in a DUPLEX state), or if any environmental sensor is reporting an abnormal value, the shc script can send an email notification to one or more email addresses that you specify. Alternatively, you can configure the shc script to deposit the notification in a directory that you specify.

Each notification message contains basic diagnostic information that should be communicated to the Stratus Customer Assistance Center (CAC) or your authorized Stratus service representative for assistance with resolving the problem.

Note: To realize the full benefits of ASN support, which includes continuous uptime and prompt service in the event of a service call, also configure your ASN connection, as described in Stratus Automated Uptime Layer for Linux-based ftServer Systems: Installation and Configuration (R013L) and in the Stratus ActiveService Network Configuration Guide (R072).

If no problems are found, the shc script sends a healthy notification at a time interval that you specify in seconds (minimum 3600 seconds, or 1 hour).

To configure the shc script, execute the following command and follow the interactive prompts:

# /opt/ft/sbin/shc --configure 

The following example shows how to configure the shc script for email notification.

# /opt/ft/sbin/shc --configure 
ASN Site ID to identify this ftServer system: [] ABC123 

Specify the method to be used to deliver notifications by 
selecting one of the following methods:
   0 - SMTP mail [no authentication]
   1 - Copy text file to Directory 
Number of desired notification method: [0]0 

Please supply one or more email addresses to which notifications 
should be sent.
Each address must correspond to section 3.4 of RFC-2822. Multiple 
addresses must be separated by a comma (',') character.
email address(es): [root@localhost] ganderson@ocean.com 
SMTP server IP address: [smtpmail.mycompany.com] smtp.ocean.com 
SMTP server TCP port: [25] 
Maximum time in seconds between notifications. A 'healthy' 
message will be sent this often [zero to disable]: 604800
Scheduling shc to run via /etc/cron.hourly/ft-shc 
Setting up log rotation for shc

The following example shows how to configure the shc script to deposit the notification in a directory that you specify.

# /opt/ft/sbin/shc --configure 
ASN Site ID to identify this ftServer system: [] ABC123 

Specify the method to be used to deliver notifications by 
selecting one of the following methods:
   0 - SMTP mail [no authentication]
   1 - Copy text file to Directory 
Number of desired notification method: [0]1 
Destination folder: [/] /root/shc 
Maximum time in seconds between notifications.  A 'healthy' 
message will be sent this often [zero to disable]: 604800 
Scheduling shc to run via /etc/cron.hourly/ft-shc 
Setting up log rotation for shc

If properly configured, the shc script sends the first notification immediately. You can also test notifications at any time by executing the script with the --test option, as follows:

# /opt/ft/sbin/shc --test 

In the future, if you want to disable the healthy notifications, run the configuration script again (/opt/ft/sbin/shc --configure) and type 0 as the maximum time between notifications.

To fully disable the shc script and notifications, remove the symbolic link to the script in the /etc/cron.hourly directory:

# rm /etc/cron.hourly/ft-shc/